art quilt

Wedding Art Quilt Process

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This slide show is a presentation of my process of a wedding photo that I created into a fabric art quilt piece which can be beautifully hung on their wall for years of enjoyment!

The last two photos of this slide show are the original photo and the completed art work from the photo.

I use a combination of fabric, acrylic paint and thread to create my art.  When it is complete, it is put on a frame with a wire so you can easily hang it on a wall when it arrives at your home.  Also on the back is a label that has the couples name (which is not present on the one above), the wedding date, and my contact information.  Each art work is signed in the front as well.

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These make a special unique portrait gift for an anniversary, birth, birthday, wedding, house warming, etc.

I would be honored to create an art piece from a photo that is special to you or a loved one.   I tried to answer all questions, however, if I missed something, please contact me and I would love to answer any and all of your questions.

Please click here to get further details of my art.

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The Wedding

A wonderful woman from Texas sent me her parent’s wedding photo to make it into an art quilt.  The following photos are showing it develop from just fabric blocking the colors to the painting process to bring this art alive.

I get nervous every time I do one of these pieces.  What if I pick the wrong color or mess up on the painting or quilting?  Do I have enough knowledge to fix my mistakes?  It’s funny how I make multiple errors on my art and seem to find away to fix it.  Plus, if I come to a point (which happens on many occasions in one piece) that I don’t know what to do or how to do it, I walk away and think about it.  I tend to do the sewing or painting in my head  first until I know it will work.

I don’t see my art as perfect by any means.  It is a growing part and a way for me to express my creativity.  I hope you enjoy seeing this and I would love to see/hear your comments!

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Sewing Curves!

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My new project!!  Double ring Quilt.   If any of you know, it is one of the most difficult traditional quilts around.  Why? Because you are sewing curved pieces most of the time.

Curved pieces have more stretch than the square or rectangle pieces because they are not cut on a straight of grain.  This leads to unwanted stretching of each piece.

With a lot of trial and error, I figured out how to do it with some ease that hopefully these tips will help you as well. By the way, you will see some dark threads on the pieces.  This is proof of my trials and mainly errors!  I will be taking a tweezer to them one night and pulling them out when I’m watching TV.

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I discovered that the concave curve (Yellow piece) is the longest and needs to “ease” into the convex (Blue piece).

img_2923 Folding all of the curved pieces and lightly pressing them gave me the center of each piece.  I pinned the pieces in three places starting with the center and then both ends.  It will not lay flat until it is pressed.

img_2924I had to sew slow and math up the edges of the fabric approximately 1/4″ at a time.  I held onto the blue fabric with my right hand and eased the yellow fabric in place.  The feed dogs grabbed the yellow fabric more than the top fabric, and I allowed that to happen.  It took some getting use to.

img_2926When it is all sewed together, all of my pieces looked like this.  The ends of each piece and centers matched.  The iron does the rest of the work. I found it easier to place the blue fabric on my iron board first and gently push the yellow fabric flat.

img_2927 Just using the tip of the iron on the crease was just what the piece needed to lay totally flat.  Remember I said that you are working with all curves?  I didn’t have to clip the seam allowance because of those same curves!

As you look at the photo above, you can see the seem allowance from the right side of the piece.  This is due to poor planning.  Most of the double wedding ring quilts you see have a light colored background and darker colored curves.  The curve can only be ironed one way.  If I ironed the seam towards the blue, it would pucker and I would have to make those slits in it to work.

This is as far as I have achieved so far.  The completed block on the top is the only completed block I have so far.  By the end of the week, I will complete the rest and post it.

Thank you for reading this blog!  Have a wonderful day!

 

Skills and Techniques, Uncategorized

T-shirt Preparation for Quilt

View 1

T-shirts are a wonderful way to remember special occasions, events, and a myriad of other reasons.  If you are one of the many people who can’t seem to give up those special t-shirts, putting them into a quilt is an excellent idea.  You may use this tutorial for creating your own t-shirt quilt or see my Etsy shop for details of how I can do a custom quilt for you.

I want to add that you can use sweatshirts, sports shirts that are made of that waffle fabric, golf shirts (polo), etc.  Use the same directions for the prep.  Message me if you have any questions.

View #1 is the front and back of the t-shirt I am demonstrating today.  Some t-shirts have printing on the back as well as the front.  You may want to have both sides in your quilt or just one side. The preparation is the same.

It is very important to wash all of the t-shirts with your normal laundry detergent and 1/2 cup of White Vinegar.  The vinegar will remove most or all of the odors.

DSCN2008View 2

After you have washed and dried your shirts, you can start cutting them apart. Be sure to lay the t-shirt flat on a table to have more accurate cutting.  Make sure you leave at least 2″ around the design you want to use.

View #2 is showing to cut sleeves away from the shirt first.  I like to cut close to the seams to allow as much extra fabric room as possible around the design.

 

View #3

Next is to  cut along the side seams of the t-shirt (view 3).  This is where it is important to have the t-shirt laying flat.  Most t-shirts do not have a side “seam” (where the manufacturer stitched it together).  There should be some sort of a crease on the sides that you can follow and cut along that crease.  If there is no crease, that is where laying it flat will show you that where that “crease” would be.  Be sure to cut along both sides.

 

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View #4

Lastly, we move on to the shoulders.  The shoulders need to be cut right next to the seams on both shoulders.

If there is a little emblem on a sleeve that you wish to be part of the quilt, just send the sleeve as is to me.

Now you are done with the scissors!

If I am making this quilt for you, all you have to do is send the part of the shirts that have the emblems you wish to have in your quilt.

Please tell me if this blog was helpful to you.